Dunga encourages Brazil to entertain

Dunga wants his Brazil side to continue to entertain football fans, but is also wary of protecting their recent defensive record.

Brazil coach Dunga said his side must retain their trademark flair, but also sustain the defensive strength they have shown of late.

After the calamitous end to their hosting of the 2014 World Cup which saw them ship 10 goals in two games, the South American powerhouse has not conceded from free play in six friendlies since.

Brazil conceded their first goal in the latest reign of Dunga - he took over from Luiz Felipe Scolari following the showpiece tournament - in a 2-1 win over Austria in November, when Aleksandar Dragovic netted a spot-kick.

Centre-back Miranda and left-back Filipe Luis have started in all six matches of Dunga's second stint in charge of the national side - he previously led Brazil from 2006 to '10 - while central defender David Luiz (four starts) has also been a regular.

Dunga said it was still important for Brazil to flaunt their attacking skills, but also rued limited time to prepare for their friendly with France in Paris on Thursday.

"We want a compact and modern team, who playing with aggression, but without losing the essence of Brazilian football, the dribble and the creativity of our players," Dunga said. 

"Of course we have little time to train. 

"We have just one training [session] to pin down the team which will play, but we have to get it [right], even with the limited time and optimize this time to seek the best."

Dunga also defended the decision to hold a closed-doors session before their clash with the French, who have a strong record against the South Americans.

Brazil's 3-0 win over France in June 2013 ended a drought of more than 20 years over their European counterparts, but they will look to back that performance up on limited preparation. 

"Well, I have nothing to say about the closed training. We do what FIFA determines," he said. 

"We followed the same procedure, we do not want to change anything, so that we both can accustom our side and you [the media] to have less discussion about that. 

"It's not closed training, secret training, it's not that. 

"It's just private… private for the players to be able to try some different moves and repeat it, without having the pressure and exposure that they have every day."