FIFPro planning legal action to protect unpaid players

After negotiations stalled last week, players' union FIFPro are to take legal action in a bid to protect unpaid players.

World players' union FIFPro will take legal action in order to allow players who go unpaid to seek a new club.

Earlier this week the union claimed that the sport was being failed by football's current transfer system in a scathing attack.

FIFPro led negotiations with European clubs and leagues in a bid to overhaul rules on contractual obligations last week, but those talks failed to bring a resolution.

A statement from FIFPro read: "FIFPro has received the unanimous support of its European members to pursue all legal means necessary in a bid to restore the basic rights of players impeded by football’s fundamentally flawed player transfer system.

"The World Footballers' Association believes it is left with no other alternative after player union representatives attending this week's meeting of FIFPro Division Europe, in Athens, reacted with astonishment to proposals for the amendment of the FIFA transfer regulations put forth by the ECA [European Clubs' Association] and EPFL [European Professional Football Leagues].

"Negotiations to reform the transfer system ground to a halt, last Friday [January 23], after representatives from the clubs and leagues rejected FIFPro's reasonable demands to protect players who are not paid on time or have their contracts unjustly terminated."

FIFPro Division Europe President Bobby Barnes added: "The basic right of players to be paid according to the terms laid out in their contract is non-negotiable.

"We entered into these negotiations in good faith and always remained committed to find a negotiated solution, but this has unfortunately not been met with reciprocity.

"The position brought forward by the employers is so imbalanced, as to be considered antagonistic.

"This meeting highlights that our patience to find solutions has been exhausted and the European members are united in their belief that more forceful action seems inevitable."

 

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