The 9 best Liverpool vs Tottenham games: how many do you remember?

Ahead of the pair's meeting at Anfield on Saturday, Tim Ellis picks out a handful of memorable clashes between the Reds and Spurs...

1. Liverpool 1-1 Tottenham, Mar 1973

Liverpool’s 'goalbound shots or headers were turned round the posts, flicked over the crossbar, deflected, diverted, smothered, or blocked,' reported the Guardian

Even Bill Shankly was lost for words when Liverpool dropped what look like being a crucial point in their three-way fight for the title with Arsenal and Leeds.

Pat Jennings saved two penalties, one from Kevin Keegan and one from Tommy Smith with just four minutes left, and remembers the match well: “It was the morning of the Grand National and Tommy Smith said I was so lucky, if I’d been riding a horse in the National I would probably have won.”

Alan Gilzean had given Spurs a shock lead, before Keegan equalised 20 minutes from the end with a mishit shot. "Liverpool’s goalbound shots or headers were turned round the posts, flicked over the crossbar, deflected, diverted, smothered, or blocked," reported the Guardian.

Pat Jennings, Liverpool

Jennings denies Tommy Smith

2. Liverpool 7-0 Tottenham, Sep 1978

The seventh goal was one for the purists, an end-to-end move of superlative speed and accuracy with Terry McDermott finishing things off

Or Liverpool 7-0 Sputs as the BBC Grandstand teleprinter had it. Tottenham snapped up two Argentines called Osvaldo Ardiles and Ricky Villa in the close season, but had failed to clock up a single win upon arriving at Anfield in September 1978.  

Liverpool's performance was mesmeric as Kenny Dalglish and David Johnson each helped themselves to a brace, Ray Kennedy netted once and Phil Neal from a retaken penalty. The seventh goal was one for the purists, an end-to-end move of superlative speed and accuracy with Terry McDermott finishing things off at the far post. "That must be the best goal Anfield has ever seen," said Bob Paisley. 

The Reds won the league by a mile, scoring 85 and conceding just 16.

3. Liverpool 3-1 Tottenham, Mar 1982

Spurs hadn't conceded a goal in reaching the League (Milk) Cup final at Wembley, where Steve Archibald gave them an early lead after prodding the ball past Bruce Grobbelaar.

The Glaswegian had a gilt-edged chance to finish things off late on in the second half but didn't take it, leaving the path clear for Ronnie Whelan, Liverpool's 'Milky Bar Kid', to equalise and make himself a hero. Whelan repeated the trick in extra time against a tiring Tottenham side that featured former Reds hero Ray Clemence in goal, with Ian Rush finishing the job in the 119th minute. 

4. Liverpool 0-1 Tottenham, Mar 1985

Liverpool were in a mini mid-80s slump after Graeme Souness’s departure to Sampdoria, with Rush unusually profligate upfront

Tottenham had last won at Anfield in 1912 as they arrived on Merseyside looking to continue their title charge in front of the TV cameras. Liverpool were in a mini mid-'80s slump after Graeme Souness’s departure to Sampdoria, with Rush unusually profligate up front and Clemence forced to pull off a number of superb saves to keep Spurs at bay.

Micky Hazard’s introduction from the bench turned out to be significant: it was his snapshot that Grobbelaar pushed into the path of Garth Crooks, who tucked home to give Tottenham all three points. Tottenham soon faded, though, with Everton winning the league by 13 points.

5. Liverpool 1-2 Tottenham, Mar 1995

This FA Cup sixth-round tie was memorable for so many reasons, including Liverpool fans' standing ovation for Spurs at the final whistle.

Robbie Fowler’s header gave the home side the advantage, but Teddy Sheringham equalised with a magnificent curling shot from just outside the area. Tottenham then struck the killer blow with 90 seconds remaining, Sheringham's clever flick freeing Jurgen "the German" Klinsmann, who stroked the ball into the corner past David “Armani” James. 

Spurs made the mistake of celebrating as if they'd won the Cup; Klinsmann also scored in the semi-final, but Gerry Francis’ charges were hammered 4-1 by eventual winners Everton.