Sven, Jose, Rafa and... Zajec?! The Prem's second wave of foreign managers remembered

With Arsene Wenger poised to celebrate 20 years as Arsenal manager on Thursday, FFT has decided to honour every foreign boss to grace (and often not) top-class football in England – all 50 of 'em. Here's the second batch of imports...

11. Sven-Göran Eriksson (England, Manchester City)

  • England: January 9, 2001 to July 2, 2006
  • Manchester City: July 6, 2007 to June 2, 2008

He tidied up Kevin Keegan’s mess, gave England’s stunned fans a 5-1 win in Munich, then reached three successive tournament quarter-finals

It’s a great irony that while appointing a foreign manager was supposed to take England to a glorious millennial future, the chosen appointment merely enshrined an outdated tactical system as doggedly as anyone born on that Atlantic archipelago.

Despite the xenophobic wails that greeted the Swede’s appointment – the Daily Mail’s Jeff Powell ranted that England had sold “our birthright down the fjord to a nation of seven million skiers and hammer throwers who spend half their year living in total darkness” – Eriksson was a winner who had collected trophies in Sweden, Portugal and Italy. He tidied up Kevin Keegan’s mess, gave England’s stunned fans a 5-1 win in Munich, then reached three successive tournament quarter-finals.

Sven-Goran Eriksson

Eriksson is introduced to a somewhat sceptical press pack in 2001

That which now seems luxury was then deemed unsatisfactory, and the suspicion remains that England’s best crop of players in half a century should have done better. Although two shootout defeats created a suitably self-pitying narrative, Eriksson was thrice outwitted by Luiz Felipe Scolari.

Tactically rigid, he was welded until late in his England reign to a strict 4-4-2 straight out of the '70s. He shunted Paul Scholes to the left wing and prompted his early retirement, and famously could never accommodate Steven Gerrard and Frank Lampard in the same team. A belated experiment with 4-5-1 only triggered a 1-0 defeat to Northern Ireland.

Few England fans bemoaned the end of his half-decade reign, but the national team subsequently got worse. Meanwhile, Eriksson has cashed cheques from Manchester City, Mexico, Notts County, Ivory Coast, Leicester, Thailand, Dubai and China. The future didn’t turn out to be bright.

Sven-Goran Eriksson

Manchester City fans plead with the club's board to retain Sven's services in 2008

12. Jose Mourinho (Chelsea, Manchester United)

  • Chelsea: June 2, 2004 to September 20, 2007 & June 3, 2013 to December 17, 2015
  • Manchester United: May 27, 2016 to date

Football journalists adored his carefully crafted soundbites; fashon mags pontificated over his stylish overcoat; Chelsea fans loved his side’s attacking brio

Curiously, between the summers of 2000 and 2004 there was only one overseas appointee at the top level of English football – Sven-Goran Eriksson to the national post. While some might have predicted a flood of substandard imports, top-flight clubs instead appointed glorious locals like Stuart Gray, Glenn Roeder and Dave Bassett.

But in the summer of 2004, a trio of major English clubs appointed a trio of major continental managers, and it was a surprise to nobody that Chelsea got their man in the seat first. Claudio Ranieri was popular but unable to slake new owner Roman Abramovich’s thirst for dominance.

Enter Jose Mourinho. In March he had proved his chutzpah with a celebratory sprint up the Old Trafford touchline after a (somewhat fortunate) late equaliser sent Porto through against Manchester United; by the end of May he had won the Champions League, to go with the two league titles, UEFA Cup and Portuguese Cup, and an invitation to take over at Stamford Bridge.

He immediately delighted and divided. Football journalists adored his carefully crafted soundbites; fashon mags pontificated over his stylish overcoat; Chelsea fans loved his side’s attacking brio (despite a later reputation for pragmatic football, his side scored 144 league goals in his first two seasons) and subsequent trophy-collecting.

It wasn’t all roses. He created a siege mentality in which certain other clubs and managers (notably Liverpool’s Rafa Benitez and Arsenal’s Arsene Wenger) were sworn enemies in a bitter, divisive media battleground. Even those fans not pitched in direct opposition tired of his shameless scene-stealing – often a ruse to protect his players, but one which led to accusations of self-centredness.

Even so, it was still something of a shock when he left Chelsea after three successful seasons, although that length of stay would become a pattern. After a term off he spent two years invigorating Inter (including another Champions League triumph), then three at Real Madrid before returning to Stamford Bridge; this time, he lasted just two-and-a-half seasons before a rancorous split.

There are those who say his confrontational style inevitably wears out its welcome – on stars, directors and fans. Equally, it's undeniable that Mourinho is as close as modern football gets to a guarantee of trophies: as at summer 2016 he has won eight top-flight titles in 14 seasons across four countries.

He's arguably the world’s finest coach at preparing for games and opponents, and he isn’t too idealistic to realise that occasionally means grinding out a result. His appointment by Manchester United – not least in conjunction with the arrival across the city of Pep Guardiola, the yang to his yin – should make for fascinating times in the Premier League.

13. Jacques Santini (Tottenham Hotspur)

  • June 3, 2004 to November 5, 2004

In 2004, Tottenham chairman Daniel Levy ordered the full continental. Instead of parachuting a Euroboss into the traditional all-encompassing British managerial role, why not install a long-term sporting director over a (frankly dispensible) head coach? He’d already tried this to an extent with David Pleat over Glenn Hoddle, but yer Europeans were sure to accept it much more readily, right?

Arnesen wanted to appoint Martin Jol, but Levy demanded a bigger name and plumped for Jacques Santini, whom he expected to lead France to Euro 2004 glory

Wrong. Levy chose Frank Arnesen for the grown-up, transfers-and-strategy role then offered the balls-and-bibs job to Giovanni Trapattoni, who politely declined. Arnesen wanted to appoint Martin Jol, but Levy demanded a bigger name and plumped for Jacques Santini, whom he expected to lead France to Euro 2004 glory (rather than quarter-final defeat by Greece). As a sop to Arnesen, Jol was appointed assistant coach, so now Spurs had a Dane over a Frenchman assisted by a Dutchman. That’s your European dream, right there.

It started well enough, with six league games undefeated and only two goals conceded, but the tide turned with four losses in the next five. An increasingly withdrawn Santini appeared to resent Arnesen’s pre-eminence and closeness to Jol, while the players perhaps understandably didn’t know who was in charge. After a home loss to Bolton, a distraught Santini avoided the press to study the tapes – but on the day club legend Bill Nicholson died, that looked like a snub. Within a fortnight Santini was gone, replaced by Jol – and within a year Arnesen had been lured away by Chelsea.

Jacques Santini

Santini's spell at Spurs was short and not very sweet

14. Rafael Benitez (Liverpool, Chelsea, Newcastle)

  • Liverpool: June 16, 2004 to June 3, 2010
  • Chelsea: November 21, 2012 to May 27, 2013
  • Newcastle: March 11, 2016 to date

And obviously it helped enormously that in his first season he won Liverpool’s first European Cup in 21 years – much-needed bragging material as Ferguson’s Manchester United had been chipping away at the Reds’ once apparently unmatchable league title total

Liverpool is a singular city, initially wary of outsiders but quick to welcome those who adapt to its ways; of its 15 post-war managers, some of them iconic, only two (Joe Fagan and Roy Evans) were Liverpudlian by birth. But Scouseness is an adaptable, adoptable concept, and Rafa Benitez was quickly clasped to the city’s bosom.

It helped that the Spaniard understood the culture of the city and club. It helped that he was anti-authority, never shy to take on figures like Sir Alex Ferguson or the unpopular owners Gillett and Hicks. And obviously it helped enormously that in his first season he won Liverpool’s first European Cup in 21 years – much-needed bragging material as Ferguson’s Manchester United had been chipping away at the Reds’ once-apparently unmatchable league title total.

Along the way they beat Juventus and runaway league winners Chelsea, and Benitez became so popular that the fans took to carrying around a four-foot gold-framed painted portrait known as the Rafatollah. He never quite delivered the league title they craved – although in 2009 he got to within four points, as close as they had been since Margaret Thatcher was in power – and left in 2010 after a disappointing final season saw them crash out of the Champions League oligarchical collective.

His six months at Chelsea were a different experience altogether – vocally despised by many fans, and always a stop-gap appointment by the board – but he did win the Europa League, completing the Blues’ trophy set. He was parachuted in too late to save Newcastle from relegation, but the fans’ reaction to him – and his decision to stay for the second-tier campaign – recalls happier times in another northern port city.

Rafael Benitez

Despite relegation to the second tier, Benitez has lifted the mood at Newcastle

15. Martin Jol (Tottenham, Fulham)

  • Tottenham: November 5, 2004 to October 25, 2007
  • Fulham: June 7, 2011 to December 1, 2013

He started so well that he was tipped to return home for the Ajax job, but stuck around and in his first full season led Spurs agonisingly close to breaking into the top four

After attempting exotic with Santini, Spurs kept it closer to home for his successor: elevating the assistant Santini didn’t want, they gave the head coach badge to Martin Jol. A Dutch Anglophile, Jol had played in England back before it was trendy and lucrative, turning out for West Brom and Coventry in the mid-to-late 1980s when English football was arguably at its lowest ebb.

He started so well that he was tipped to return home for the Ajax job, but stuck around and in his first full season led Spurs agonisingly close to breaking into the top four; only a dodgy lasagne and subsequent loss at (a deliriously happy) West Ham stopped them displacing Arsenal from the Champions Chums Club.

The following season they finished fifth again, but a £40m summer spending spree was dictated by director of football Damien Comolli with Jol’s input ignored. Sevilla manager Juande Ramos was approached and, cruelly, Jol’s fate became public knowledge during a home game: he was informed by his nephew.

After a year at Hamburg and 18 months at Ajax, Jol returned to the Premier League with Fulham. His first season ended in a pleasing ninth place, his second in a disappointing 12th, and his third abruptly and prematurely after six consecutive losses. He would be the first of three Eurobosses that season at the Cottage, but that’s a different story…