Where are they now? Brazil's 2002 World Cup winners

Brazil 2002 World Cup

Cafu

He remains the only player to have appeared in three World Cup finals and now looks after a few business interests

Forever smiling and forever bombing forward, Cafu was already a household name before captaining his country in Japan and South Korea. But the loveable wideman – who started his career as an attacking midfielder in Brazil before adapting to full-back and wing-back roles in Europe – cemented his place in the pantheon of Seleção greats when he followed in the footsteps of Bellini, Mauro Ramos, Carlos Alberto and Dunga by lifting the World Cup trophy aloft in Yokohama.

He wouldn't have been on the podium were it not for a freak pre-tournament injury to Emerson, but Cafu certainly grasped his moment in the spotlight, shouting a message for his wife ("Regina, I love you!") when the ticker tape was flying and revealing a t-shirt whose message ("100% Jardim Irene") referenced his humble beginnings in São Paulo.

He remains the only player to have appeared in three World Cup finals and now looks after a few business interests. FFT saw him at a samba concert in London a couple of years ago and can confirm he's enjoying his retirement.

Gilberto Silva

He played an important role in the formation of Bom Senso FC, a de facto footballers' union set up to drag Brazilian football into the modern era

A surprise inclusion in the squad, Gilberto profited from Emerson's absence to make the defensive midfield berth his own. Things clicked perfectly, his positional diligence allowing the team's more expressive players freedom to cut loose.

He wasn't short of suitors after the World Cup, but it was Arsenal who won the race for his signature after ironing out a few contractual issues. "What I like was the fact that he kept things simple," said Arsene Wenger, under whom Gilberto won the Premier League title and two FA Cups before moving to Panathinaikos.

He returned to his homeland for quietly impressive spells with Grêmio and Atlético Mineiro, and played an important role in the formation of Bom Senso FC, a de facto footballers' union set up to drag Brazilian football into the modern era. He now juggles media and charity work, and also has a giant anteater named after him at London Zoo.

Gilberto Silva

Gilberto (right) moved back to Brazil with Gremio in 2011