Injury clinic: Broken nose

Our guide to those pains and strains that keep you out of the game, and how to recover

WHERE’S THE PAIN?
A direct blow to the nose will damage the cartilage or cause it to break. It will be tender to touch and make a crunching sound when moved. Breathing out of your nostrils will be painful and swelling will start to appear under your eyes. It may start to bleed and your nose will be crooked.

FIRST RESPONSE
Damage to blood vessels in the nose can cause excessive bleeding. Plugging the nostril with a cotton wool bud can stop this. This will allow the player to continue playing, but the physio must make sure blood is not clogging up in the nose.

More after the break

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO
At half-time or full-time the player’s nose needs to be cleaned and examined by the physio. It’s important the player’s airways are clear and ice should be applied to limit the swelling and pain. The player can take over-the-counter nasal decongestant to aid breathing through the nostrils. Signs and symptoms of a broken nose should resolve over the following 7-10 days.

MAKE SURE IT DOESN’T HAPPEN AGAIN

Such a break rarely requires surgery or a significant time away from the pitch. However, if the air entry in and out of your nostril is affected or you suffer repeated injuries, then realigning your nose to improve appearance and breathing can be done by a specialised surgeon.

 

Advice and treatment provided by Bolton head physio Andy Mitchell.

Promo sitewide