Lists

FourFourTwo's 100 Best Football Stadiums in the World: 100-91

We are part of The Trust Project What is it?

FFT's 100 Best Stadiums: 100-91 • 90-81 • 80-71 • 70-61 • 60-51 • 50-41 • 40-31 • 30-21 • 20-11 • 10  9 • 8 • 7 • 6 • 5 • 4 • 3 • 2 • 1

#FFT100STADIUMS The 100 Best Stadiums in the World: list and features here 

92. Estadio Nemesio Camacho

Stadium facts

  • Located Bogota, Colombia
  • Opened 1938
  • Tenants Millonarios, Independiente Santa Fe
  • Capacity  36,343
  • Record attendance 49,000

Many people believe that Nemesio Camacho was a star Colombian player from another era, but they’re wrong. In 1930, Camacho’s son Luis donated land for the biggest stadium of the country’s growing capital, with the condition that it carried his father’s name – although it is more commonly known as El Campin, reflecting its earlier use as a camping ground.

Either way, it was the perfect gift to celebrate the city’s 400th anniversary. The original designer, a German engineer called Federico Leder Müller, used the open land to create a very gradual slope, so the mountains could be seen. An upper tribune was added decades later.

By the end of the century, El Campin had retained the ability of producing amazing ambience for football (and rock gigs), but the stadium was in bad shape. “We liked the original stadium that apparently everybody hated”, said Luis Callejas, the Colombian architect behind the massive renovations. Suitably refreshed, the structure doesn’t feel outdated at all – and was even made earthquake-proof. - MM

91. Stadium Australia

Stadium facts

  • Location Sydney, Australia
  • Opened 1999
  • Tenants Australia, plus teams in various other “codes”
  • Capacity 83,500
  • Record attendance 114,714

Built for the 2000 Sydney Olympics, Stadium Australia opened to much fanfare in March 1999 with a series of high-profile events.

The city was awash with goodwill and pride at a stadium that held no fewer than 110,000 people and one that quickly set about posting new world-record crowds in rugby league and rugby union. 

That pride reached unprecedented levels when Sydney hosted what were billed as “the best Olympics ever” by former International Olympic Committee boss Juan Antonio Samaranch.

The ground was reconfigured in 2003 with a reduced capacity of 83,500 and two years later hosted Australia’s historic penalty shootout victory over Uruguay to qualify for the 2006 World Cup. At the time it was only Australia’s second-ever World Cup qualification.

Previous issues with the playing surface have been resolved and the ground regularly hosts major domestic and international sporting events – including welcoming English giants Chelsea and Tottenham to town earlier this year – and is firmly established as Sydney’s premier sports stadium. – JD

I WAS THERE: "I’ll never forget the moment John Aloisi’s penalty rippled the net to win the shootout against Uruguay and send the Socceroos to their first World Cup finals in 32 years. Or the collective outpouring of emotion that followed from the 80,000-odd fans present.It was one of the strangest yet most exhilarating atmospheres I’ve ever experienced at a football match. It was almost as if the crowd was too nervous to manage any coherent chants, so for two hours of normal play it was just regular and increasingly feverish cheers and screams, which reached a crescendo during the penalty shootout. A stadium built for the Sydney Olympics came of age as a football venue that night." - Andy Jackson, FFT Global Brand Director

FFT's 100 Best Stadiums: 100-91 • 90-81 • 80-71 • 70-61 • 60-51 • 50-41 • 40-31 • 30-21 • 20-11 • 10  9 • 8 • 7 • 6 • 5 • 4 • 3 • 2 • 1

#FFT100STADIUMS The 100 Best Stadiums in the World: list and features here