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Ranked! 11 of the most remarkable saves that even David de Gea would be proud of

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3. Craig Gordon, Sunderland 1-0 Bolton (Premier League, 2010)

I managed to flick it upwards and get a bit of spin on it as well which somehow managed to get the ball over the bar

- Craig Gordon

Sunderland stopper Gordon became the most expensive British goalkeeper when he joined the Black Cats for £9m in 2007. He didn't quite live up to expectations at the Stadium of Light, but this point-blank, one-handed stop from Zat Knight was rightly awarded 'Best Save' in the Premier League's 20 Season Awards in 2012.

"At the time, I didn't really know how I managed to keep the ball out and turn it over the bar," he said. "I managed to flick it upwards and get a bit of spin on it as well which somehow managed to get the ball over the bar.” 

2. Gregory Coupet, Barcelona 2-0 Lyon (Champions League, 2001)

This was a double save made with such astonishing speed of thought and movement that Barcelona's players could be forgiven for almost wheeling away in celebration

This was a double save made with such astonishing speed of thought and movement that Barcelona's players could be forgiven for wheeling away in celebration.

After a backpass under pressure went wrong, Coupet was forced to fling himself backwards and head the ball onto his own crossbar to avoid the forfeit of a free-kick. The Lyon keeper then recovered in time to make a remarkable diving save from Rivaldo's follow-up header.

David James was in raptures on commentary: "For me it's the best save because it involves so many different components. Personally I was buzzing off it just watching the replay.”

Coupet prevents an own goal and then repels Rivaldo 

1. Gordon Banks, England 0-1 Brazil (World Cup, 1970)

Gordon Banks hasn’t had to buy a drink for the last 46 years. That’s what happens when you keep out the world’s best player with a save that redefined what was possible for goalkeepers.

Pele leapt to meet Jairzinho's right-wing cross with a firm, downward header which seemed destined for the back of the net. Banks had other ideas. 

"I noticed in shooting sessions that sometimes the ball would kick up a bit more off its first bounce and come up higher than normal”, the former Stoke and Leicester man commented later. "It was this that helped me make the save as I was able to anticipate that it was going to bounce up and it meant I could flick it over."

Banks doesn’t even rate the save as his personal best, though, placing a penalty stop from Geoff Hurst in the 1972 League Cup semi-final against West Ham above it. Most goalkeepers could only dream of making one half as good as either.

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