Ranked! The 13 best bicycle kick goals EVER

After Emre Can's spectacular strike for Liverpool, Greg Lea counts down the greatest over-the-shoulder goals featuring Van Basten, Rooney and two Brazilian geniuses

13. Christian Benteke, Liverpool vs Man United (2015)

Slow-motion replays don’t do any favours to certain goals, and Benteke’s is one of them. On second viewing, it becomes clear that the ball wasn’t as far into the corner as it initially seemed, but this stunner is best appreciated in real time.

Only then can you get a true measure of the sheer power that the Belgian is able to generate, as he smashes the ball past David de Gea in front of the United fans.

12. Marco van Basten, Ajax vs Den Bosch (1984)

Van Basten was responsible for the greatest goal in European Championship history with his magnificent volley against the Soviet Union in 1988, and this strike for Ajax three years earlier was another example of his excellence.

Loitering on the shoulder of a Den Bosch defender, Van Basten bides his time as the Amsterdam giants progress the ball upfield. He then creates just enough space for himself as the cross is delivered, and fires a clean and controlled overhead kick in off the far post.

11. Dimitar Berbatov, Man United vs Liverpool (2010)

If Benteke’s bicycle kick at Old Trafford was primarily impressive for its power, Berbatov’s at the same ground was – surprise, surprise – rather more delicate. The cerebral striker, who must see the ball late as Wayne Rooney attempts to head it goalwards, cushions it on his thigh and then caresses it into the net via the underside of the bar, all while falling to the floor.

The dumbfounded disappointment of Liverpool’s players, who seem to look around for someone to blame before concluding that nothing more could have been done, says it all.

10. Trevor Sinclair, West Ham vs Derby (2001)

We know what you’re thinking: Sinclair’s famous bicycle kick goal came for QPR against Barnsley, didn’t it? That may be so, but this lesser-known (and strangely forgotten) effort for West Ham in 2001 is worthy of mention by its own merit. 

The move preceding the finish is special enough: Paolo Di Canio chips a corner to Joe Cole on the edge of the box, with the England international taking a touch and lofting a cross towards the back post without the ball touching the ground. Sinclair, judging the trajectory of the delivery perfectly, then takes a few steps backwards and unleashes a phenomenal sideways strike into the far corner of the net.

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