Ranked! The 10 best Arsenal kits of all time

Agree with our list of standout Gunners shirts? Jon Spurling adjudicates

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Classic Arsenal shirts from across the years. Don't agree with our selection? Tell us in the comments below or on Twitter or Facebook.

10. The invincible shirt

In the 2003/04 campaign, Arsenal players thrilled fans with the purity and class of their football as they went through the league season unbeaten. Midfielder Gilberto recalled: “It was the last season where the focus was on the football, and not the money, or Roman Abramovich, or the constraints from the new season.”

In keeping with this, Arsenal’s home shirt design is a purist’s delight, with clear lines between the red and the white, and the O2 logo in the middle of the shirt. Twelve years on, the shirt worn by the Gunners side which secured the league title at White Hart Lane looks distinctly baggy, in contrast to the pyrotechnic tops worn by modern Arsenal stars.

9. Sega power

Considering that Arsenal were enjoying a golden spell in the domestic sphere, it was entirely apt that in the 2001/02 campaign, they wore a pure golden shirt on their travels – albeit with SEGA plastered all over the front of it. From February, the Gunners eviscerated their rivals with a phenomenal set of victories, and wrapped up the title in style thanks to Sylvain Wiltord’s winner at Old Trafford.

Kanu (seen hurdling Wiltord in the clip below) commented: “For me, Arsenal’s away shirt should always be gold or yellow. It runs through the club’s blood stream.”

8. Wenger and Nike

Back in the days when Arsene Wenger’s teams really were a cut above the rest, they wore this red and white Nike classic, which saw its finest hour when the Gunners defeated Everton to clinch the first half of the 1998 Double at Highbury, with a delighted Tony Adams grabbing the final goal. It’s a reminder of more carefree times, when long term JVC sponsored the club, when Wenger was king, and when attention focused on on-pitch success, rather than off-field concerns about finances.

7. The Golden Nugget

In the 1988/89 campaign, George Graham’s Arsenal were far more potent on their travels than they were on a quagmatic Highbury pitch. So much so, in fact, that Graham once described his side as “golden nuggets” (on account of their sulphur yellow and blue change strip) as the Gunners hit teams on the counter-attack away from home.

This was never better illustrated than in the dying seconds of the decisive match at Anfield on May 27, as Michael Thomas charged forward to win the league for his team at the death. The luminescent yellow top, contrasting with the emerald green Anfield pitch, gave Thomas’s dramatic winner a cinematic quality, which later marked the climax of the film Fever Pitch.

Next: Fit for a first trophy