10 underappreciated Premier League goals that deserve way more recognition

Seb Stafford-Bloor puts Bergkamp vs Newcastle and Di Canio vs Wimbledon to one side and selects several strikes that really should be better remembered

1. Steve Froggatt (Coventry vs Everton, 1998)

We may reserve special affection for smooth technique and the finer parts of the game, but our shared guilty secret is that we all prefer goals of outrageous violence

"His first goal for Coventry City, will he ever get a better one?"

No he wouldn't, Martin Tyler.

Why is this goal so rarely seen on British television? Goodness knows, but it belongs in the Premier League's title sequence until the end of time. We may reserve special affection for smooth technique and the finer parts of the game, but our shared guilty secret is that we all prefer goals of outrageous violence. This was that: a missile of a shot that might have killed someone but for the netting.

Laces.

Froggatt's goal at 0.45

2. Rod Wallace (Leeds vs Tottenham, 1994)

It bears comparison with George Weah's famous goal against Verona in 1996 and is arguably superior

Less under-appreciated, more just forgotten. Wallace would actually win Goal of the Season in 1993/94 for this slaloming run, but it's since been lost to the naffness of the times. Back then, Premier League Land was more a vague concept and less the opulent jewell it would become; the saggy goal-netting, Sky Sports' ropey graphics and Tottenham's horrendous, Space Invaders-influenced away shirts betray that.

Still: Rod Wallace! Regardless of era, football doesn't get much prettier than this. It bears comparison with George Weah's famous goal against Verona in 1996 and is arguably superior: Wallace's path to goal was more cluttered, while the zig-zagging nature of his run meant he covered more ground. The finish, meanwhile, is almost impossibly smooth.

"I got the ball in our half... er... ran past a few players... and bent it in."

Yes. Yes you did, Rodney.

3. Paolo Di Canio (West Ham vs Chelsea, 2003)

Di Canio could do wonderful things with a football, but he was also an impudent, original player

If there was a downside to Di Canio's scissor kick against Wimbledon, it was that it normalised every other goal he scored in England. Rarely, if ever, has British football seen such a perfect split-second confluence of balance, timing and technique.

But this was his other side. If that more celebrated goal showed Di Canio's technical execution at its finest, this was his imagination at work - and, perhaps, a more illustrative account of his brilliance. Di Canio could do wonderful things with a football, but he was also an impudent, original player who would try to change games in ways which wouldn't even occur to others.

It was his talent which made him watchable, but it's really his spirit that lingers.