7 of the most mental moments in European Cup history: dopey Daum, magic Cosmin and more

Relive these wacky episodes as the Champions League knockouts crank into gear

1. The ultimate selection headache

The Stuttgart gaffer lost concentration and illegally fielded a fourth foreign player in the second leg at Elland Road

Christoph Daum is a colourful character, and he presided over one of the European Cup’s grandest cock-ups. After his Stuttgart side beat Leeds 3-0 at home in the 1992/93 competition, Daum lost concentration and illegally fielded a fourth foreign player in the second leg at Elland Road.

UEFA duly awarded the Yorkshiremen a 3-0 win, meaning Stuttgart’s away goal triumph was overturned and a replay required – at Camp Nou of all places. In front of just 7,400 fans, Leeds prevailed 2-1. Daum was dubbed ‘Christoph Dumb’ by a gloating British press, and sacked soon afterwards.

2. Jimmy earns a day off

Johnstone struck a deal with his boss ahead of their fixture with Red Star Belgrade: if they won by a hatful, Jinky could skip the away trip

“I ain’t getting on no plane, fool!”

Celtic winger Jimmy Johnstone almost certainly didn’t say that to manager Jock Stein in November 1968, but he did have a flying phobia.

Johnstone struck a deal with his boss ahead of their fixture with Red Star Belgrade: if they won by a hatful, Jinky could skip the away trip. Terror proved to be rocket fuel: he scored twice and set up two more, powering the Scots to a 5-1 victory and avoiding a white-knuckle ride to Yugoslavia in the process.

Jimmy Johnstone

Johnstone (left) fires home Celtic's fourth against Red Star

3. Old Lady humiliated by Butt

Everybody loves a goalscoring keeper, and in the Champions League, Hans-Jorg Butt is the daddy

Everybody loves a goalscoring keeper, and in the Champions League, Hans-Jorg Butt is the daddy. The 6ft 3in son of Saxony has bagged a remarkable 32 career strikes, including three in Europe – all of them penalties; all against Juventus.

He outwitted Edwin van der Sar while playing for Hamburg during a crazy 4-4 draw in September 2000, slotted home against the Old Lady again in a 3-1 win with Leverkusen in 2002/03, and converted a crucial spot-kick for Bayern Munich in the final group game in 2009/10. Nice.

4. No medals for meddlers

The English FA appealed to UEFA in 1959 to demand that only British referees should be used from the quarter-finals onward

Back in the early days of the European Cup, the rules were not clearly understood by all. In a blatant show of xenophobia, the English FA appealed to UEFA in 1959 to demand that only British referees should be used from the quarter-finals onwards, while the Dutch – clearly not getting the point – asked if they could enter the Oranje national side.

UEFA slapped them both down and in 1997 had to do the same to Juventus, when they suggested a final round played over a week in one country. Meddlers!

Mark Clattenburg

Certain British referees probably wouldn't mind seeing such a rule introduced today