Milan coach Inzaghi not fearful of the sack

A poor run of form has led to reports Filippo Inzaghi will be dismissed as Milan head coach, but he insists the pressure is nothing new.

The ex-Milan striker Italian replaced former team-mate Clarence Seedorf in the dugout in the close-season for his first senior managerial post.

However, Inzaghi has struggled to help the club improve their on-pitch fortunes and a four-match winless Serie A run has left them in eighth place - seven points adrift of the UEFA Champions League places.

Reports in Italy have suggested that Milan have sounded out former Roma boss Luciano Spalletti and that defeat at Lazio on Saturday could spell the end for Inzaghi.

Inzaghi is unconcerned, though, claiming that there is always pressure when you are head coach of a club the size of Milan.

"The president [Silvio Berlusconi] has been calling me all week twice a day," Inzaghi said. "I am fully aware of his closeness and that of the club's in an uneasy moment.

"I am sure that we will come out of it. Every match is decisive for me. We have two tough matches against Lazio [Milan also face the Rome club in the Coppa Italia on Tuesday]. Nothing has been compromised because we’re in a normal position in the league table.

"Often all you need is just one match, a spark to get out of it. I expected a bit of a telling off from Berlusconi which didn't happen because he knows that we're giving our all and working very well.

"A coach makes mistakes even after 25 years of coaching. I am moving on with my team convinced of my ideas.

"The criticisms make me stronger, perhaps because in these 20 years I didn't always receive compliments. I am sure that we will do well based on the hunger that I saw in training by my players. I feel very calm."

Milan's latest setback came in a 1-0 home defeat to Atalanta last weekend and Inzaghi stated everyone is desperate to bounce back at the Stadio Olimpico this weekend.

He added: "We all have the desire to show what we can do. Tomorrow we have to show this on the pitch. Words serve very little."