FourFourTwo's 100 Greatest Footballers EVER: 60 to 51

Milan’s greatest goalscorer, Brazil’s World Cup record-breaker and the most intense kiss of the World Cup

60. Kevin Keegan

Kevin Keegan

Why are they here?
‘Mighty Mouse’ became the first British sportsman to successfully embrace commercial opportunities. On the pitch, KK’s swashbuckling displays helped garner trophies for Bill Shankly’s Liverpool side in the early 1970s, including a league title and the UEFA Cup.

Under Shanks’ replacement Bob Paisley, Keegan – by now an England star - took his game to another level, helping Liverpool to their first European Cup in 1977. He moved to Hamburg to “expand my horizons” that summer, winning a Bundesliga title, plus two Ballon d’Ors in a three-year spell.

Career highlight
“Goals pay the rent, and Keegan does his share,” enthused BBC commentator David Coleman after Keegan smashed home his first goal in the 1974 FA Cup Final against Newcastle. He added the third in a comprehensive 3-0 win.

Words: Jon Spurling

59. Andres Iniesta

Andres Iniesta

Why are they here?
Football’s modern age has given us more exciting players than Andres Iniesta, some more decisive ones and even a few more skilful ones. But precisely zero have been as gorgeously watchable.

In a way, Iniesta can count himself unlucky to have spent his career playing in two bone fide all-time-greatest sides, at club and international level: the reverence for him would be even higher had he not been surrounded by Messi, Xavi & Co. That he has not only held his own in such company, but carved a niche as perhaps the most subtly inventive of the lot, is what he’ll have to settle for. (That, and a medal collection that is quite literally complete.)

Career highlight
Guiding home the goal that won the 2010 World Cup, a strike whose chaotic build-up was punctuated momentarily by a cigar-puffing backheel from the man himself.

Words: Alex Hess

58. Adolfo Pedernera

Adolfo Pedernera

Why are they here?
Magically two footed, incredibly fast, outrageously talented technically, Pedernera was crucial to the so-called La Maquina (The Machine) – the greatest-ever River Plate team.

He was equally lethal as a centre-forward, attacking midfielder or left winger, and Alfredo Di Stefano admired him in his youth, claiming that Pedernera was his idol and the most amazing player he had ever seen. The Argentine won five championship titles and made a massive contribution off the pitch as well, leading the strike against a salary cap and moving to Colombia in order to earn more money.

Career highlight
Pedernera won the Copa America twice with Argentina, in 1941 and 1945.

Words: Michael Yokhin

57. Karl-Heinz Rummenigge

Karl Heinz Rummenigge

Why are they here?
An excellent dribbler who could crash in shots with virtually no backlift, the powerfully built Rummenigge was arguably the most effective forward in Europe during the late 1970s and early '80s.

His fruitful partnership with midfielder Paul Breitner (Bayern Munich were nicknamed ‘FC Breitnigge’) helped bring shedloads of silverware to Bavaria, including three European Cups in succession. Rummenigge starred on the international stage as well, winning the European Championship in 1980.

Career highlight
In the World Cup's first ever penalty shootout, Rummenigge stayed typically calm, netting his spot kick against France in an infamous semi-final to help send eventual runners-up West Germany into the final.

Words: Jon Spurling

56. Daniel Passarella

Daniel Passarella

Why are they here?
Widely considered one of the best centre-backs of all time, Passarella is remembered for his range of qualities. The Argentine was a ferocious defender, strong in the tackle and extremely good positionally. His heading abilities were absolutely extraordinary given the fact that he was just 5ft 8in tall.

His attacking contribution was incredible, with 175 goals scored in all competitions. Passarella was also known for building the attacks from behind with his immaculate passing. His leadership qualities were second to none, and he was nicknamed the Great Captain. He won titles, too – six of them with River Plate before moving to play for Fiorentina and Inter in Serie A.

Career highlight
Captaining Argentina to the World Cup triumph in 1978 was the greatest feat, and it’s hugely unfortunate that Passarella missed the 1986 tournament through illness – but was still in the squad and got a second winner’s medal.

Words: Michael Yokhin