8 things Jurgen Klopp must do to win the Premier League this season

Jurgen Klopp

Liverpool haven't tasted league glory for 26 years, but hopes are higher under their popular German chief. Tim Ellis explains what the German needs to do to end the Reds' barren run 

For Liverpool fans, the past quarter-century hasn't been entirely joyless. With three FA Cups, four League Cups, one UEFA Cup and a Champions League triumph that would have looked farfetched in a Roy of the Rovers cartoon, the Reds have a recent trophy record that most clubs in the country would crave.

However, it's the prospect of another year without English football's crowning glory, the Premier League title, that frustrates those at Anfield.

Rafael Benitez's side went close in the 2008/09 season, losing just twice and finishing as runners-up to Manchester United. Brendan Rodgers' class of 2013/14 went even closer, falling just two points short of Manchester City after a superb spring-time title battle.

So what are the chances Jurgen Klopp could go one better? It's possible, but there's plenty of work to do.

1. Capitalise on a lack of European football

Liverpool keep going in their perfect season while we have no time to prepare matches like they have

- Jose Mourinho, Mar 2014

During Liverpool’s title tilt of 2014, Jose Mourinho couldn’t help himself: “Liverpool keep going in their perfect season while we have no time to prepare matches like they have. When you have six days a week to prepare a match [like Liverpool] and maybe train twice a day, you have conditions to improve that nobody else has.”

Finishing eighth last season was a direct result of trying to manage an ultimately unsuccessful Europa League campaign on Thursday nights. Now Jurgen Klopp has the time to implement his high-octane demands with a bit of breathing space for his players.

Liverpool

No European football means more time for training, and no excuses for fatigue

2. Foster that team spirit

Klopp’s two titles at Borussia Dortmund were based on the idea of slaying a behemoth, namely Bayern Munich. The former Mainz boss has always thrived on beating teams that look better than his on paper. Currently, the Premier League hosts some monster teams with monster managers that will test this theory to the limit.

When the 49-year-old was appointed in October, he said: “If it’s possible, can we be the hardest team to beat in the world? Let’s try to be this. First of all, we have to talk to all Liverpool fans about what our expectations [are]. Expectations can be a big problem.” He may feel the burden of those this season.

3. Forge a strikeforce in the image of Suarez and Sturridge

In 2013/14 there was the SAS, Luis Suarez and Daniel Sturridge, whose primary job was to score heavily and ensure the goals leaked at the other end weren't so damaging. The SAM – Sturridge and Sadio Mane – doesn’t sound as nifty, but it might just work.

Mane has a great desire to win back possession and break on the counter-attack, attributes which will suit Klopp’s needs as well as the pace of his strike partner

Mane has a great desire to win back possession and break on the counter-attack, attributes which will suit Klopp’s needs as well as the pace of his strike partner. On the other hand, he's prone to going for long periods without finding the net: eight of his 11 Premier League goals last season came in the last eight games.

4. Embrace the pressure of achievement

If Liverpool find themselves in a position where there's something to play for at the end of the season then they'll have to overcome the fear that has hindered them over the last decade. Since the Champions League final defeat in Athens nine years ago, the Reds have seemingly learned how to lose when the heat is on, losing last season’s Europa League final against Sevilla, the 2015 FA Cup semi-final to Aston Villa and all but conceding the Premier League title to Manchester City after losing to Chelsea in 2014. The Anfield unit need to create a mentality where pressure is a friend rather than a foe.

Liverpool, Sevilla

Liverpool must embrace the possibility of winning, rather than fearing the idea of failure