FourFourTwo's 100 best foreign Premier League players ever: No.10, David Ginola

Newcastle were on the outside peering in where the Premier League title was concerned in the summer of 1995, but the arrival of a twinkle-toed Frenchman from PSG helped the Toon Army come closer to realising their ambitions than ever before. Former room-mate Warren Barton remembers the silky charmer

David Ginola, Warren Barton

In many ways, I think David was unique in English football, particularly at that time. I remember being in the hotel with Les Ferdinand when he was first introduced to the players at Newcastle. He came in with a little touch of grey hair – it’s white now, obviously – a white linen shirt, some nice linen trousers, a pair of sunglasses and a few beads.

Now, Les is a good-looking man but we both went, “Jesus, we don’t want to be stood next to him in the team photo”. He was very charming too. We both dropped our knives and forks while we were trying to eat our eggs and bacon, and there was him gliding gracefully into the room. He was like a god, we were both in awe of him – and we still laugh about that now.

That was my first introduction to David the person, not the footballer and I ended up sharing a room with him in the first couple of months of the season. In the end I had to ditch him because he was drinking coffee and smoking at midnight too regularly. He wasn’t your ideal room-mate when you were trying to get some shut-eye.

I ended up sharing a room with him in the first couple of months of the season. In the end I had to ditch him because he was drinking coffee and smoking at midnight too regularly

We ended up living right next to each other and our wives became good friends. I then ended up buying a property, which I’ve still got in the south of France, near David’s family. He helped me with the builder, the land – he was great, just one of those guys who couldn’t do enough for you. We would also go with him to various functions when he was working for Cerruti as well.  

David the Destroyer

His famous goal against Barnsley (in 1999) pretty much summed up everything about him – pace, power and then that great shot at the end

On the pitch, I guess he helped us build something special at Newcastle too. He was a special player. Those words gets bandied about far too regularly in the modern era but he deserved that tag because of what he could do with the ball at his feet. How much would he be worth now? God only knows.

He had a great first touch and when he was with us I saw him destroy Gary Neville, I saw him destroy Lee Dixon and I saw him do even worse to Curtis Fleming at Middlesbrough and Richard Edghill at Manchester City. He had a great ability to hold it, body-swerve and then go the other way; left foot, right foot.

David Ginola

Nottingham Forest's Stuart Pearce was another full-back given twisted blood by Ginola

I remember one match in pre-season against Hearts away. Me and Rob Lee were playing in midfield, and this is when David had just come to the club and was in great form, unbelievable form. We both looked at each other and said “f***ing hell, he’s a player”. We had played with Peter Beardsley and trained with Gazza with England but this was just something else entirely. There was just something about his ability that was unique.

His famous goal against Barnsley (for Tottenham in 1999) pretty much summed up everything about him – pace, power and then that great shot at the end. Without a doubt he’s one of the best foreign players to play in the Premier League but he had to adapt to it. He knew what changes the Premier League was going through at the time and he was brilliant with the club and brilliant with the club’s supporters, who absolutely adored him even if he didn’t have the first idea what they were saying when he arrived.

He would say ‘I can’t understand the Geordie accent’. I would tell him just to keep smiling. In the end his English was amazing. He just had that enduring style and I think it was something that people just warmed to.